LA 111 final exam

fall 2017

 

I. This first part of the exam is closed-book. You may not use any aids whatsoever in writing your translations.

 

Translate all three of the following passages (Mico is the speaker in all three passages):

 

 

1.    Storax - Non rediit hac nocte a coena Aeschinus,

Neque servulorum quisquam qui adversum ierant.

Profecto hoc vere dicunt: si absis uspiam,

Aut ubi si cesses, evenire ea satius est

Quae in te uxor dicit et quae in animo cogitat

Irata quam illa quae parentes propitii.

 

 

2.    Haec fratri mecum non convenient neque placent.

venit ad me saepe clamitans, "Quid agis, Micio?

Cur perdis adolescentem nobis? cur amat?

Cur potat? cur tu his rebus sumtum suggeris?”

 

 

3.    Ah,

Ausculta: ne me obtundas de hac re saepius.

Tuum filium dedisti adoptandum mihi:

Is meus est factus: si quid peccat Demea,

Mihi peccat: ego illi maximam partem feram.

 

 

In your translations stay as close as you can to the original, to show that you understand the Latin grammar.

 

Please include the following statement on your exam:

 

I hereby affirm that these translations are solely my own. I have not worked with anyone else when writing them. I have not used a dictionary, notes, translation or any other aid in writing this part of the exam. I have not and will not share information about this exam with anyone else before the end of the final exam period.

 

When you have finished these translations send them immediately to me in the form of a Word document attached to an e-mail addressed to rosivach@fairfield.edu.

 

When I receive your translation I will confirm receipt. If you do not receive my reply within 24 hours e-mail me again at the same address.

 

Save a copy of your translations in case something gets lost in transmission.

 

 

 

 

II. This second part of the exam is open-book. You may use any aids you choose to help you except a translation in any modern language (this includes the translation on Perseus and any and all on-line translation tools or electronic device apps).

 

I recommend that you spend some time on each of the five passages before deciding which three you will translate for the exam.

 

 

Translate three of the following passages (the links will lead to the Latin texts on Perseus):

 

1. Jerome, translation of the gospel of John, chapter 1, verses 1-5 (in principio ... non comprehenderunt)

[if only one verse appears click “chapter” in the box “View text chunked by” in the left margin of the screen]

 

 

2. Catullus, poem 70 (the whole poem)

Catullus has been deceived by his girlfriend more than once.

 

 

3. Horace, carmina, book 1, poem 4, lines 13-16 (scroll down to: palllida Mors ... fabulaeque Manes)

The poet is urging his friend Sestius to enjoy the pleasures of spring while he may, because death is inevitable.

 

 

4. Nepos, Cato, chapter 3, sections 1-2 (in omnibus rebus ...confecit orationes).

This passage discusses some of the talents of this famous Roman statesman.

 

 

5. Phaedrus, fabulae Aesopicae, book 1, poem 4 (complete)

The moral of this fable is in its first line.

 

 

In your translations stay as close as you can to the original, to show that you understand the Latin grammar.

 

Please include the following statement on your exam:

 

I hereby affirm that these translations are solely my own. I have not worked with anyone else when writing them, nor have I consulted any other translation or used a translation app in writing this part of the exam. I have not and will not share information about this exam with anyone else before the end of the final exam period.

 

When you have finished these translations send them in the form of a Word document attached to an e-mail addressed to rosivach@fairfield.edu. When I receive your translation I will reply confirming receipt. If you do not receive my reply within 24 hours e-mail me again at the same address.

 

Save a copy of your translations in case something gets lost in transmission.